THE NEW WORKER

The Weekly paper of the New Communist Party of Britain
Week commencing 27th October 2017


Lead story

Universal Credit could sink the Tories

by Daphne Liddle

STEPHEN KINNOCK, the Labour MP for Aberavon, last week openly called for a motion of no confidence in the Tory government to be tabled in Parliament, which if passed could see May’s government brought down and a new general election that would see Jeremy Corbyn become Prime Minister.

Read the full story here >> Universal Credit could sink the Tories

DWP forced to name workfare bosses

THE DEPARTMENT for Work and Pensions (DWP) last week lost a four-year legal battle to keep the names of employers using unpaid benefit claimants secret under the Mandatory Work Activity (MWA) scheme, otherwise known as workfare.

Read the full story here >> DWP forced to name workfare bosses

NHS Troubles

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

FIRST Minister Nicola Sturgeon was forced from her official residence on Monday when part of the ceiling in the 225-year-old neoclassical building in Edinburgh collapsed, forcing her to move to a nearby expensive hotel whilst costly emergency repairs are undertaken. This image of things falling about her ears is a perfect metaphor for the state of contemporary Scotland, in particular the health services.

Read the full story here >> NHS Troubles

Editorial

Witch-hunt continues

JEREMY Corbyn is now well established as Labour leader since the results of last May’s election and the right wing of the party is having to reconcile itself to the prospect that he will be there for a long time. They have mostly given up trying to undermine him and those close to him, and are now trying to convince him that they are long-term loyal supporters and to sway his policies closer to their own.

But there is one issue that won’t go away — the issue of trying to paint leading Corbyn supporters — and Corbyn himself by association — as anti-Semites.

When the media campaign against Corbyn was at its height these allegations arose against a number of leading activists. They were suspended and an inquiry was launched during which Corbyn took a hands-off stance. Shami Chakrabarti, formerly of the civil rights organisation Liberty and now a Labour peer, drew up a code of practice which recognised that criticism of the Israeli government’s policies did not amount to anti-Semitism.

Read the full editorial here >> Witch-hunt continues