THE NEW WORKER

The Weekly paper of the New Communist Party of Britain
Week commencing 19th of October 2018


National News

When black people were automatic ‘security risks’

Sputnik

BACK IN THE 1960s senior MI5 officials believed that black people could not be trusted in high-level security roles, newly declassified documents reveal. The head of MI5 at the time is said to have remarked that the risks of employing “coloured staff” originated “simply from the colour of a man’s skin, which gives him a chip on his shoulder”, adding that: “It would be a long time before this chip is removed.”

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

Hospital workers strike back!

by New Worker correspondent

LAST Friday morning more than 330 cleaners, porters and caterers at Royal Bolton Hospital walked out to picket lines at the entrances to the hospital on a 48-hour strike. If the issue is not resolved, Unison has informed the company that a second three-day strike will take place next week.

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

BT backs down

by New Worker correspondent

IN A similar battle, the Communication Workers Union (CWU) has been celebrating a successful campaign at British Telecom (BT) call centres across the country that has resulted in the total ending of agency contracts.

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

London Weighting victories

by New Worker correspondent

AROUND a hundred workers responsible for maintaining electricity meters at Scottish Southern Electricity’s (SSE’s) London depots have won a pay rise of £2,807 after action led by the union Unite

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

Pay to Use the NHS

by New Worker correspondent

Nursing trade union the Royal College of Nursing (RCN) has declared its opposition to the Government’s recent announcement of the immigration health surcharge. This increased surcharge means that the amount that non-EEA [non-European Economic Area] nationals already pay per family member, per year of their visa to use the NHS, will increase from £200 to £400.

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

Scottish Political News

by our Scottish political correspondent

SNP Conference

UNFORTUNATELY the timing of the Scottish National Party’s (SNP’s) annual conference in Glasgow was scheduled for a time unsuitable for last week’s New Worker’s production routine but we cannot let the end of the party conference season go unmarked.

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

The Quango Queen

When, at his desk outside the pearly gates, St Peter asked a deceased lawyer how old he was, the lawyer replied he was 55, only for St Peter to query this because he had billed clients for over 70 years of work.

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

DPRK — The Future Works!

by New Worker correspondent

KOREAN solidarity activists met last weekend to hear a report back from members of a recent delegation to Democratic Korea that took part in celebrating the 70th anniversary of the foundation of the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) in Pyongyang. The meeting at the Kings Cross Neighbourhood Centre in the heart of London was organised by the Korea Friendship Association (KFA), whose chair Dermot Hudson had headed the UK KFA delegation that visited visited the DPRK last month.

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

University of Chester hails China link

Xinhua

CHINA’S Belt and Road Initiative will create a two-way street between the east and west says the head of the University of Chester.

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

LSO returns to Hanoi

VNS

AFTER amazing Hanoi’s audience with an outdoor concert last year, the world-famous London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) was back in the Vietnamese capital for a free musical extravaganza earlier in the month.

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

International News

French workers strike back!

International Communist Press

LAST WEEK thousands of French workers, students and pensioners took to the streets for protesting the anti-people policies of President Emmanuel Macron. Nearly 300,000 people were mobilised in more than 100 rallies organised across France, on the first inter-professional day of action since the summer holiday.

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

Turkey: A graveyard for workers

Sol international

AROUND 21,800 workers have lost their lives due to fatal injuries at work over the last 16 years, according to a report prepared by the deputy leader of the Republican People’s Party, the main opposition party in the Turkish parliament.

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

Thousands of Palestinians held illegally in Israel

CPI

ACCORDING to figures from the Israel Prison Service (IPS), on 30th June of this year Israel was holding some 5,300 Palestinian residents of the West Bank as “security detainees” or prisoners in incarceration facilities. With the exception of

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

Italy forces refugees out of model refugee town

Radio Havana Cuba

ITALY’S Interior Ministry has ordered that all asylum-seekers be transferred out of the small southern town of Riace, which had gained international attention for its innovative model for refugee integration

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

Iran to side-track US sanctions

Sputnik

AHEAD of the new wave of anti-Iranian sanctions, due to come into force in November and bound to impact the Islamic Republic’s oil exports, Israel’s Mako media group has leaked an alleged secret agreement between Moscow and Tehran

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

Features

Who killed Jamal Khashoggi?

by Dmitry Sudakov

Who is behind the disappearance of Saudi journalist Jamal Khashoggi? It’s the question that’s rocked the foundations of Saudi Arabia, the world’s second largest producer and first largest exporter of oil. This is what Shamil Sultanov, President of the Russia—Islamic World Centre for Strategic Studies thinks. THE Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi went missing on 2nd October after he entered the consulate office of Saudi Arabian in Istanbul to obtain a divorce certificate. Turkish officials say that the journalist was killed in a special operation conducted by Saudi special services after he refused to return to his homeland. Supposedly, Khashoggi’s body was dismembered and taken out of Turkey.

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

Let’s think about legacy Corbyn’s plan to teach Britain’s colonial past

Sputnik

Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn plans to create the Emancipation Educational Trust, aimed to teach English students the true history of Britain’s colonial past, including slavery and colonialism. Sputnik discussed this issue with Dr Deana Heath, Senior Lecturer in Indian and Colonial History at the University of Liverpool.

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

Venezuela: 20 years in the gunsights of US imperialism

Workers World (US)

THE USA and its proxies in Latin America are gearing up for possible military intervention against the Bolivarian government of Venezuela. Last February, then-Secretary of State Rex Tillerson toured Latin American countries, rallying support for such aggression. US officials have met since then with dissident Venezuelan officers to discuss support for a coup. And President Donald Trump reportedly asked his administration to consider a US intervention. What has turned this country on the northern coast of South America, which possesses the single largest oil reserves in the world, into a prime target of US imperialism?

[Read the complete story in the print edition]