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The Weekly paper of the New Communist Party of Britain


National News

The bollocks of a ‘Trump Brexit’ and the myth of Left Remain

by Ben Soton

“THOSE AT the top of society and those at the bottom have always understood each other; it’s those annoying people in the middle who don’t understand either who are the problem.” This is a myth Boris Johnson is going to play on in his bid to win the next election. He will claim to be fighting a culture war on behalf of ordinary folk against the irritating chattering classes and Brexit will be at the centre of it.

By opposing Brexit Jeremy Corbyn is walking into a trap. Not a carefully hidden “booby trap” but one that might as well have “TRAP” written on it. At the Durham Miners Gala this year he talked about opposing a “Trump Brexit”; where American firms are given control of the NHS. Arguably a bit pointless Donald Trump has ruled the NHS out of any possible trade deal. Does this m

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The grim anniversary of the collapse of Carillion

by New Worker correspondent

FRIDAY 6th September marks 600 days since the collapse of Carillion on 15 January 2018 when the construction and facilities management outsourcing giant was forced into compulsory liquidation with liabilities of £7 billion which saw thousands of workers lose their jobs.

Needless to say nothing’s been done to seriously bring to account the company’s directors or senior managers responsible for its collapse.

Unite the Union has condemned this inaction despite several regulators launching investigations into the circumstances of the company’s collapse.

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The Workers’ Beer

by New Worker correspondent

READERS should raise a glass in support of workers at the Belgian AB-Inbev brewery in Magor in Gwent who have voted overwhelmingly for an overtime ban in their fight to secure fairer terms and conditions.

Unite is demanding that AB-Inbev, whose revenues grew 4.8 per cent to $54.6 billion last year, cut the working week of its employees to a level in line with the national average and for a fair wage increase equivalent to or greater than the current level of inflation (RPI).

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Airport victory

by New Worker correspondent

RECENTLY these pages have reported on the struggles at various airports by the workers who keep the planes flying and passengers well fed and watered when they don’t. It is good to report that some of these struggles have borne fruit.

At London’s Heathrow airport industrial action by baggage handlers has been averted following protracted negotiations between Unite and their employer. Hundreds of baggage handlers employed by Babcock Airports Ltd, have won an inflation busting two year pay deal after eight months of negotiations and extensive talks at the conciliation s

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Sweatshops for schools

by New Worker correspondent

THE START of the new school year sees pupils arrive in the morning at school in their smart new uniforms and come home in a less than pristine condition.

One supplier of these uniforms, Trutex, which has been supplying school uniforms in the UK for more than a century and a half, has so far refused to release information about the factories it uses, according to labour rights campaigning organisation Labour Behind the Label.

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Tis the Season to be Jolly!

by New Worker correspondent

WITH LESS than four months to go the first batches of mince pies a

To mark this start of the festive season USDAW, the shop workers’ union, has published a survey of over a thousand of its Scottish members which supports the union’s demand that large shops remain closed on New Year’s Day.

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The Queen’s Speech

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

Despite recent events in London Scottish politics has not been entirely without interest, although the level of drama was much less. The latest event was the Holyrood version of the Queen’s Speech which took place on Tuesday afternoon.

Delivered by Queen Nicola the first personally she announced that the “centrepiece” of the SNP government a “Scottish Green New Deal” which will cure the climate emergency which she pronounced in April. This package includes spending £500 million on improved bus priority infrastructure, which basically means painting bus line signs on the roads. She wants to reduce emissions from the London railways to zero by 2035 through the continued electrification of the network, as well as battery-powered trains. One wonders if the electricity will come from clean sources. One way of dealing with the climate emergency would be to forbid the extraction of North Sea oil, but that would upset their budgetary calculations.

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A Record By-Election for Labour

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

Last Thursday the Liberal Democrats held on to the safest Holyrood seat in Scotland. The Shetland by-election was caused by the resignation of the incumbent, Tavish Hamilton Scott, who sat for the seat since Holyrood was established. It is an obscure but verifiable fact that Scott was Scottish Liberal Democrat leader from 2008 to 2011, but the pinnacle of his career was probably being deputy minister for finance and public services and minister for transport and telecommunications when Labour and the Liberals were in coalition.

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Tory Civil War Starts

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

Ruth Davidson, who was credited with the revival of Tory fortunes in Scotland which resulted in them becoming the official opposition resigned as leader and will be leaving Holyrood at the next election in 2021. She voted Remain and had the misfortune to support three of Boris Johnson’s opponents in the recent leadership contest. However the main reason for her departure was that having just returned from maternity leave she was unwilling to put the demands of front-line politics before motherhood.

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Glasgow’s Street Battles

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

Last Friday saw a revival of an ancient Scottish tradition. An early evening “Irish Unity” march by the James Connolly Republican Flute Band (JCRFB) in Glasgow was the subject of a much larger Loyalist counter-protest which included smoke bombs resulting in riot police and dog units blocking the route to keep the warring factions apart. Two men were arrested.

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Chinese culture showcased in Edinburgh

Xinhua

AUDIENCES at the Edinburgh Art Festival experienced Chinese culture first hand at a number of shows presented by the 2019 China Focus project. Six selected productions premiered at the Scottish festival included Rite of Spring, choreographed by renowned Chinese dancer Yang Liping, going on the show.

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Oliver Cromwell

1599—1658

OLIVER CROMWELL, the leader of the bourgeois English Revolution, died on 3rd September 1658. Cromwell, the MP for Huntingdon, was the leading Parliamentary commander during the English Civil War, which began in 1642 and ended in 1649 with the trial and execution of Charles Stuart and the abolition of the monarchy. The Republic of England, or Commonwealth as it was usually styled in English, was proclaimed soon after.

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International News

Venezuela foils new terrorist attacks

by Ed Newman

THE government of Venezuela has denounced a failed series of attacks against several strategic targets in Caracas, conducted from Colombia, according to information revealed by the Vice President and Minister of Communications and Tourism, Jorge Rodriguez.

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Hezbollah strikes back at Israel

Radio Havana Cuba

THE LEADER of the Lebanese Hezbollah movement has warned Israel against any future attacks on Lebanon saying that in case of such attack all Israeli forces will be at risk. Sayyed Hassan Nasrallah made the remarks in a televised speech on Monday, saying that Sunday’s operation by Hezbollah fighters in which an Israeli armoured car was hit, was meant to send the message to Israel that “if you attack, then all your border and your forces will be at risk.”

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Hands off Konev’s statue!

by our European Affairs correspondent

A STATUE to Marshal Ivan Stepanovich Konev, a Soviet hero of the Second World War, has been covered up and hidden behind scaffolding following repeated paint and graffiti attacks by reactionary gangs. According to the municipal authorities of Prague 6, the largest district in the Czech capital, this is the cheapest way to protect the statue from vandalism.

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Hong Kong: The end is coming for the rioters

Xinhua

RIOTERS IN Hong Kong on Saturday once again resorted to escalating violence. They stormed government and legislative offices, threw petrol bombs at police and set fire to a number of places including police headquarters.

Facing flagrant violent acts, the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region (HKSAR) government and the Hong Kong police took decisive measures to enforce the law and stop the violence, sending a clear warning to the rioters.

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The first day of school in Cuba

by Charles McKelvey

TODAY IS the first day of school in Cuba. Here in Havana, near the studios of Radio Havana Cuba, a multitude of children could be seen, walking to their schools in their school uniforms, new book bags in hand, accompanied by their parents and grandparents.

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Features

Trump and his minions are preparing to kill millions

by David R. Hoffman

WHEN I WAS practicing law, I often had clients come in and say, “I need a will and I want my children to inherit my assets in equal shares.”

A seemingly simple request, and, more often than not, it was assumed that, in a matter of minutes, I would hand them a freshly prepared will ready for their signature.

But then my questions came: Who is going to administer your will? What if he/she refuses or is unable to do so? If one of your children dies before you, who gets his/her share? What if all your heirs die at or near the same time, like in a plane crash? And, depending on the complexity of the will, this list could go on.

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Capitalism: the vandal of the environment

by Rob Gowland

WANT TO HEAR a truly disturbing statistic? Try this one: More than 20 per cen

Over the last couple of hundred years we have seen an enormous number of species of animals become extinct. For a while, humans were largely unconcerned by these depredations. The disappearance forever of a species like America’s passenger pigeon or Australia’s thylacine was no more than poignant. Sad, but not overly important. It did not affect the rest of us significantly. The Wollemi Pine tree was found to still be alive — though rare - in the Blue Mountains of New South Wales.

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Not that many Egyptians miss Mubarak

by Aboulfotouh Kandil

On 22nd August 2019 the Economist published an article entitled Many Egyptians miss their deposed president, Hosni Mubarak.

Predictably, numerous stakeholders including political analysts and followers would read that article with curiosity seeking explanations as to why many Egyptians would miss Mubarak, particularly after all he had done to them during his 30 years of dictatorial rule.

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