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The Weekly paper of the New Communist Party of Britain


National News

Law and Order

by New Worker correspondent

IT IS very important that police officers who arrest or beat up left-wing demonstrators should be members of their trade union, the Police Federation. The same goes for the back office civilian workers, who in many cases are represented by Unison.

At the union’s recent police and justice sector conference in Southport the question arose of what happens to them and other such as those in the Probation Service in the light of Boris Johnson’s pledge to increase police numbers by 20,000.

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Ticket troubles

by New Worker correspondent

THE RMT transport union launched a fresh campaign this week to halt London Overground ticket office closures. It is opposing plans to cut hours at 45 stations to the bare minimum and to close the ticket offices altogether at Brondesbury, White Hart Lane and West Hampstead.

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Curse of low pay

by New Worker correspondent

IN THEIR LINE of duty archaeologists sometimes have to brave many dangers, such as working in damp ditches whilst digging out half a leather boot or braving the curse of the mummy. Archæologists employed by the Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) face more a mundane problem however — low pay.

Prospect members working at MOLA have just voted 78 per cent in favour of strike action (with 94 per cent for action short of a strike) over pay and the failure of their management (the wealthiest local authority in Britain, if not the world) to implement a pay structure. Apart from work for the museum, MOLA’s 300 staff undertake archaeological work on behalf of clients in London and further afield, including Crossrail and HS2.

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Worse low pay

by New Worker correspondent

ANOTHER GROUP fighting against low pay (and doubtless much lower pay than the London archæologists) are railway cleaners. The latest battle ground is in Liverpool, where the demand for the Real Living Wage is being stepped up.

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Trouble in store

by New Worker correspondent

WORKERS at the warehouse serving the 416 Wilko discount stores are facing a drastic worsening of their working conditions that might see them take strike action from today. About 1,800 GMB members at two Wilko distribution centres, Magor in south Wales and Worksop in Nottinghamshire, are strongly opposed to forced weekend working. Gary Carter, GMB National Officer, said: “None of them want to take industrial action, but they’ve been backed into a corner by a contract that will impose on their family time and well-being.

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A message from Julian Assange

Detained in a high-security prison, WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange risks being extradited to the USA where he faces jail for disclosure of state secrets. Meanwhile, concerns about his health are mounting. Sputnik spoke to Aymeric Monville, a member of WikiJustice, to find out about Julian Assange’s incarceration conditions.

Sputnik: What can you tell us about Julian Assange’s health?

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Booming Cross Border Trade

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

For centuries it was a common practice for the inhabitants of the Scottish and English borders to steal each other’s cattle. A recent report produced for NHS Health Scotland by consultancy firm Frontier Economics confirms the existence of a new type of cross border raider: thirsty Scots seeking to bypass the SNP’s minimum price of alcohol laws.

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Made in China

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

Donald Trump’s recent trade war with China has had an unexpectedly adverse impact on a major American business: Bible publishing. According to the September edition of the Scottish Free Presbyterian Magazine (FPM), major Bible publishers headed off to Washington to plead with the US Government for exemptions to tariffs being imposed on goods from China because so many have their printing done in China.

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Savage America

REVIEW

by Mark Campey

The Management of Savagery, how America’s National Security state fuelled the rise of Al Qaeda, ISIS and Donald Trump by Max Blumenthal. Verso Books, London. Hardback (2019): 400pp, £18.99. ISBN-10: 1788732294; ISBN-13: 978-1788732291. Kindle (2019): 432pp, £12.32. ASIN: B07P5RHC8S. Paperback (due 2020): 400pp, £16.23. ISBN-10: 1788732308; ISBN-13: 978-1788732307.

ANY READER of the New Worker should be familiar with the author who contributes to the GrayZone, a website which uses investigative journalism to expose imperialism’s actions against progressive countries. Max Blumenthal’s book goes a long way to exposing how the USA and its allies have gone about trying to create chaos in Middle Eastern countries that have historically been allied with the former Soviet Union and now Russia. The purpose of this was to allow Israel, Pakistan, Turkey, Saudi Arabia and Qatar to provide either political or material support for extremist terrorist groups within Afghanistan, Iraq, Libya, Yemen and more lately Syria.

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

International News

US troops make way for Turks in Syria

Telesur

THE USA began pulling troops back from the northeast Syrian border Monday, opening the way for a Turkish strike on Kurdish-led forces long allied to Washington, in a move US President Donald Trump hailed as a bid to quit “endless wars”.

Trump said it was too costly to keep supporting Kurdish-led forces fighting IS Group, adding “it is time for us to get out of these ridiculous endless wars”. “Turkey, Europe, Syria, Iran, Iraq, Russia, and the Kurds will now have to figure the situation out,” he said.

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USA—DPRK talks stall in Stockholm

Sputnik

THE Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) has warned the USA that if Washington does not end its “hostile policy” towards Pyongyang and does not propose a realistic solution to denuclearisation by the end of the year, north Korea will not continue negotiations.

“We have already made it clear that if the USA again fingers at the old scenario which has nothing to do with the new calculation method, the dealings between the DPRK and the USA may immediately come to an end. As we have clearly identified the way for solving the problem, the fate of the future DPRK—USA dialogue depends on the US attitude and the end of this year is its deadline,” a statement published by the state-run Korean Central News Agency (KCNA) said.

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Israeli troops attack Palestinians in Nablus

Radio Havana Cuba

ISRAELI troops have attacked Palestinians who were trying to prevent hundreds of extremist settlers from storming Joseph’s Tomb on the outskirts of Nablus in the occupied West Bank.

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Deadly protests pose serious challenge to Iraqi government

by Jamal Hashim THE demonstrators who stormed the Iraqi streets in central and southern Iraq have posed a serious challenge to the government of Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi.

The protests erupted last week when thousands of angry demonstrators took to the streets in Baghdad and other Iraqi cities to protest against increasing unemployment, government corruption and lack of basic services.

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Trump’s way: Shoot migrants and put snakes in the river

by Lena Valverde Jordi

BELEAGUERED US President Donald Trump is still in very hot water, since the beginning of investigations aimed at an impeachment process now reveal that in a discussion with his aides he suggested that migrants crossing the border should be shot in the legs “to slow them down” — and the Rio Grande could be filled with poisonous snakes.

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LSO returns to Hanoi

VNS

AS MANY AS 100 artists from the London Symphony Orchestra (LSO) took part in the Vietnam Airlines’ Classic — Hanoi Concert 2019 at the Hoàn Kiếm Lake pedestrian zone last weekend.

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Features

Will Labour’s battery factories kick-start a sales boom?

Sputnik SALES OF ELECTRIC cars in Britain have been growing since 2014 but still remain less than two per cent of the total sold. Can Jeremy Corbyn’s plans for a “Green Industrial Revolution” kick-start the electric car industry?

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Trump’s ‘Telephone Gate’ and its Discontents

by Greg Godels

ONLY A PERSON who embraces her or his historical short-sightedness could be aghast at Trump’s self-serving phone call to the president of Ukraine. Actually, it is not the people in the USA who are shocked and appalled by Trump’s heavy-handed, supposedly “unprecedented” attempt to undermine a political rival; it is the cable TV chatterboxes, the Democratic Party hit-men, and their addicted acolytes who self-righteously recoil from Trump’s brazen, ham-fisted corruption.

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Cuban care of Chernobyl children

by Cira Garcia

THE STORIES of solidarity of the Cuban people and government in health, education and military missions are many and full of humanism, generosity and love. Almost every Cuban was aware of the catastrophic accident at the Ukrainian nuclear plant in Chernobyl on 26th April 1986.

Three years later, news continued to hit the headlines of the Cuban press when the humanitarian programme was created to provide long-term medical attention to the children affected by the explosion. Cuba did not hesitate when the authorities of the former Soviet Union asked for help and immediately offered assistance to thousands of children from the most affected regions in Russia, Belarus and Ukraine.

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