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The Weekly paper of the New Communist Party of Britain


National News

Housing trouble

by New Worker correspondent

NEIGHBOURHOOD workers at five Peabody Trust housing association sites in London are balloting for strike action for only the second time in its history.

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Low pay battles

by New Worker correspondent

TUESDAY morning saw members of local government unions Unite, GMB and Unison, lobbying Local Government Employers at their Westminster HQ over low pay.

Unions have tabled a pay claim calling for a 10 per cent increase for all staff and for a minimum rate of £10 per hour with a two hour reduction in the working week (with no loss of pay), one extra day of annual leave and the ending of the freeze on allowances.

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De Bello stipendium

by New Worker correspondent

UNIVERSITY lecturers belonging to the University and College Union (UCU) have backed strikes over both pensions, and pay and conditions.

In all, 79 per cent of those voting backed strike action in the ballot over changes to the Universities Superannuation Scheme (USS) whilst in the ballot on pay, casualisation, equality and workloads, only slightly fewer, 74 per cent, backed strike action. Unfortunately, the turnout was low, meaning that only about 40 out of 147 institutions secured the right to take action because under Tory laws, votes are counted on a branch by branch level. Being realistic, if less than half the members are energetic enough to vote then they are unlikely to mount a very impressive picket line.

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Corbyn attacks Trump for backing Johnson

Sputnik

AS THE general election campaign begins, the country’s relationship with the USA post-Brexit will become a major point of discussion amongst the candidates, with Boris Johnson pivoting towards the USA for a trade deal and Jeremy Corbyn opposing such a move on the grounds that it would lower standards and sell off British services to US corporations.

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Clan Wars

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

THE Bòrd na Gàidhlig, which is a five million pound per year quango charged with encouraging the use of Gaelic as an official language of Scotland has been roundly condemned for its shortcomings and incompetence in a still secret report produced by consultancy firm Deloitte. Set up in 2005 the Bòrd na Gàidhlig has offices in Inverness, Stornoway, Glasgow, Fort William, and Portree, presumably because nobody could agree about where the headquarters should be.

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Election News

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

It is early days in what will be a long drawn out election campaign. But already there have been casualties. One is Ross Thompson, the Aberdeen South Tory MP who announced that he was not defending his seat after being accused of molesting a Scottish Labour MP in the Strangers’ bar in the Commons. Thompson denied the allegations, (the second time such claims had been made against him) saying they were a smear. His is not the first Scottish political career to come to a sticky end as a result of an incident in a Palace of Westminster watering hole.

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On the terraces

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

In the east end of Glasgow, the Green Brigade who are diehard Celtic fans have been making the headlines again. At a recent home match against the Rome club, Lazio, they turned themselves into the ‘Brigata Verde’ and displayed a banner showing Benito Mussolini hanged upside down after his execution by partisans alongside the slogan “Follow your leader”. This was in response to the Lazio fans who, in accordance with their well-known views, made a point of marching through the streets giving the fascist salute before the match.

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anti-fascism

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

While the Green Brigade’s sometime anti-fascism (they equally hate the mildest of opponents) is clearly to be applauded it doesn’t always go down well with the other Celtic fans. The fines might not amount to more than a week’s wage for a star player, but some other fans have different priorities.

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Stop Universal Credit!

by New Worker correspondent

NCP leader Andy Brooks joined other comrades and friends picketing the DWP HQ in Westminster last week to protest against the hated ‘Universal Credit’ scheme and demand that Labour scrap it if they win the next election.

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Return from the land of Juche

by New Worker correspondent

COMRADES and friends heard Korean solidarity activists talk about their recent delegation to Democratic Korea at the Lucas Arms in central London last weekend. Dermot Hudson and James Taylor were part of a three-strong Korean Friendship Association (KFA) delegation that went to the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) to take part in solidarity meetings last month.

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China tourism at World Travel Market

by Xuxin

SOME 40 exhibitors with about 120 representatives from China showcased a variety of China’s tourist sites at the 2019 World Travel Market London (WTM), which kicked off at the ExCel centre in London’s Docklands on Monday.

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International News

Dresden declares ‘Nazi Emergency’

by Ed Newman

THE eastern German city of Dresden has declared a “Nazi emergency” as officials warned of a rise in far-right support and violence. The city is the birthplace of the Islamophobic Pegida movement, which holds weekly rallies here, and the anti-immigration Alternative fÜr Deutschland (AfD) party won 28 per cent in September’s regional elections.

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Hong Kong protests

Sputnik

VIOLENCE, vandalism and bloodshed have consumed Hong Kong in the last few days as anti-government protests entered their 22nd week. But it would appear that protesters’ numbers are declining at the same time.

The Hong Kong Police Force and its ranks of riot police were faced with a number of situations this weekend, ranging from roadblocks and arson, to knife attacks and ear biting.

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Anti-imperialists rally in Havana

by Jorge Ruiz Miyares

After an intense weekend of debates, the ‘Anti-Imperialist Encounter of Solidarity, for Democracy and against Neo-liberalism’ closed in Havana on Sunday with the approval of a plan for the defence of the peoples against the interference of the USA and the international right.

On Saturday the leader of the Workers Party (PT) of Brazil, Gleisi Hoffmann, received more than two million signatures, collected in Cuba in just 14 days, to demand the release of former president Luis Inácio Lula da Silva, and a picture that accredits the signatures and calls for the end of his unjust imprisonment.

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Argentina elections: A move forward or just a swing of the pendulum?

by Emile Schepers

THERE WAS good news out of Argentina for the working-class movement last month as the neo-liberal government of right-wing President Mauricio Macri was thoroughly trounced at the polls. Macri, of the ‘Together for Change’ bloc, lost heavily in the presidential race to Alberto Fernández of the ‘Front for Everybody’ coalition, which includes the left-wing of the Peronist Justicialist Party, as well as the Communist Party of Argentina and other left and centre groups.

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GM strike ends — solidarity the biggest winner

by Martha Grevatt

THE 40-DAY strike of almost 50,000 General Motors (GM) workers in the USA came to an end on the afternoon of Friday, 25th October. The majority of striking United Auto Workers (UAW) members voted to accept the contract agreed to by GM and union negotiators. The vote was 57 per cent in favour, 43 per cent opposed.

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Features

US imperialism’s natural allies

by Raúl Antonio Capote

THE VOICES of ‘hard power’ are less inhibited when making recommendations regarding the role of the USA in the world, as compared with their colleagues inclined towards so-called ‘smart power’.

Irving Kristol, theorist of the most belligerent conservatism and prominent disciple of Leo Strauss, took for granted an ‘American Imperium’ and didn’t hide proclaiming it: “One of these days, the American people are going to awaken to the fact that we have become an imperial nation.” But the difference between the American empire and the European model, Kristol says, is that: “Our missionaries are in Hollywood.”

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Joe Biden: Over his head, out of his depth

by Timothy Bancroft-Hinchey

AFTER YEARS of Russophobic insolence and diatribes and after his family’s recent history in Ukraine was exposed for all to see, it is crystal clear who and what Joe Biden is: in a word, unfit for office as President of the USA. He should not take himself too seriously...

In constantly pressing the anti-Russia button, Biden is following a line that has become hackneyed to the point of ridicule. It is a line that is popular amongst those of his generation, growing up in the shadow of McCarthyism, those who belong to the yesteryear of international relations, whose generation created the hell-hole that is planet Earth today.

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Cuban—Venezuelan co-operation prospers

by Lena Valverde Jordi

FOR NEARLY 20 years the Integral Co-operation Agreement between Cuba and Venezuela has stood against the unilateral, coercive measures unleashed by the USA as a firm mechanism for co-operation, solidarity, resistance, development and friendship between the two Latin American nations.

Many are the obstacles raised by the sanctions against Caracas and by the ironclad economic, commercial and financial blockade against Havana, as well as by the interference in the fields of health and education, amongst others.

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