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The Weekly paper of the New Communist Party of Britain


National News

Hands off Assange!

by New Worker correspondent

HUNDREDS of protesters turned out to demonstrate in London against the planned extradition of Julian Assange and the appalling treatment that he has received at the hands of the British state last weekend.

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On the Rails

by New Worker correspondent

TRANSPORT union RMT has announced a further two days of strike action on South Western Railways (SWR) as part of its struggle against the removal of guards on trains.

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Deadly cuts

GENERAL UNION GMB, which represents school support staff, has discovered that the number of nurses based in publicly funded English schools has fallen by 11 per cent since 2015, according to figures extracted from the Department for Education.

This is a particular threat to disabled children, who are now generally educated at mainstream schools and who require specialist support. It has also bee

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Dead Tree Press

by New Worker correspondent

MANY DECADES ago this correspondent was shocked to discover that the Beano and Dandy shared the same editor. In retrospect, running two weekly children’s comics out of the same Dundee building might not have been too onerous. Now JPI Media have taken this trend to a much further level.

Euan McGrory, presently editor of the Edinburgh Evening News, has become editor of the Scotsman, Scotland on Sunday, Falkirk Herald, Fife Free Press and Southern Reporter, all at the same time.

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Tartan Knives Are Out

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

THE NEWS that there is a contest within a political party to secure the nomination to become a party’s candidate for a marginal constituency might not sound very significant. But the case of the battle to become Scottish National Party candidate for the Holyrood constituency of Edinburgh Central, presently held by former Scottish Tory leader Ruth Davidson (who is not standing again) is an important one. It has attracted two SNP heavyweights (in both senses), Angus Struan Carolus Robertson, the former pretend deputy leader and Joanne Cherry QC who already sits for Edinburgh South West at Westminster.

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An Unnoticed Anniversary

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

The first anniversary of the new BBC Scotland TV channel passed almost unnoticed by the BBC itself. Launched on Sunday 24 February last year, it was intended to end Scottish opt-outs from BBC One and Two.

It is only thanks to digging by the Sunday Times into the Broadcasters’ Audience Research Board (BARB) figures that we know just how successful it has been. Its launch attracted 752,000 viewers, the next day 90 per cent of them gave it up. Now it appears that more than half of them have followed suit. On average the channel attracts 35,000 nightly. But the programme which was a justification for setting up the channel, an hour-long news programme called The Nine attracts a mighty 4,000 viewers. Anyone who has watched it will be amazed it has so many, perhaps they are morbidly fascinated at the ability of presenters to spin out the most trivial of items for what seems like an eternity. If they had any scoops beyond Partick Thistle’s latest signings they have not stuck in my mind.

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Tin Foil Hat Politics

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

It is a well-known fact among a certain class of political commentator that Britain’s departure from the EU and Trump’s election as US President was due entirely to and all-powerful Russian interference in those elections. That is blindingly obvious. How else could the masses possibly reject the combined benevolent wisdom of the BBC, the Guardian and the New York Times?

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New Mandarin-English pre-school for London

by Huaxia

ONE OF the first few Mandarin-English immersion schools in Britain officially opened in south London last month joining the continuing zeal here and beyond for learning Mandarin Chinese.

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Dimbleby slams Johnson over BBC

by Oleg Burunov

VETERAN BBC TV presenter David Dimbleby has hit out at Prime Minister Boris Johnson’s “pernicious” attempt to curb the BBC licence fee.

In December, Boris Johnson reportedly ordered his aides to review the mandatory £154.50 BBC annual licence fee and whether failure to pay it should be decriminalised.

“The BBC is under threat in a way it has never been before. The pernicious route they [the government] are using is to say the licence fee is wrong or unfair. I don’t believe it is wrong or unfair,” Dimbleby told Germany’s ARD TV channel last week.

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Splitting images

TV REVIEW

by Ben Soton

THE BBC has a tendency to create dramas about people whose lives are a totally detached from the rest of the population. Recent examples are Gold Digger, which this column reviewed last year and to a limited extent the comedy Motherland; although this drama may have been redeemed with the inclusion of the working-class character Liz played by Philomena Clunk.

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International News

Israel’s desecration of body condemned

by Ed Newman

HUMAN RIGHTS activists have expressed outrage after a video widely shared on social media showed an Israeli military bulldozer dragging the body of a Palestinian man killed by the regime’s forces in Gaza, calling the action a crime against humanity and a blatant violation of international criminal law. “This is a war crime,” tweeted the Legal Centre for Arab Minority Rights in Israel known as Adalah.

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Former Egyptian leader dies

Xinhua

EGYPT held a military funeral on Wednesday for the country’s former president Hosni Mubarak who died on Tuesday at the age of 91.

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Last defender of the Soviet Union passes away

IDOC

DMITRY YAZOV, the last appointed Marshal of the Soviet Union, died on Tuesday in Moscow after a long illness. He was 95 years old.

His career extends from the Siege of Leningrad to the formation of the State Committee on the State of Emergency (SCSE) which tried to stop the counter-revolutionary forces in 1991.

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Defend Polish communists!

THE PERSECUTION of the Communist Party of Poland continues. The trial against the members of the editorial board of the party’s newspaper Brzask (Dawn) is scheduled to restart new month. The first court session will be held on the 3rd March.

The trial has gone on for over four years, despite the acquittal verdict of the court issued last year. The appeal of the prosecutor was the basis for restarting the trial. For the last four years, the prosecutors’ office has been directly subordinated to the government. This trial is a part of a campaign made by the state authorities to ban the Communist Party of Poland (CPP).

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Brexit talks ignite new row over Elgin Marbles

Sputnik

A LONG-RUNNING disagreement between Greece and Britain over the true ownership of the Elgin Marbles, a collection of Greek marble sculptures from the Parthenon dating back thousands of years, has been reignited after a draft of ongoing post-Brexit trade negotiations was leaked to the public.

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Features

Memories of a Soviet ace in the Korean War

Sputnik

FOR NEARLY 40 years, direct Soviet involvement in the air war over Korea from 1950–1953 remained a tightly-kept state secret, with US planners long left speculating about how the young and relatively inexperienced Chinese and north Korean pilots could manage to shoot down so many planes belonging to the powerful US Air Force.

Last week Russia solemnly marked Warriors–Internationalists Day, a holiday dedicated to the thousands of Soviet soldiers who served in conflicts around the world during the Cold War. In honour of the occasion, journalist Andrei Kots sat down with Maj-General (retired) Sergei Kramarenko, a decorated Soviet Air Force ace who served in the Second World War and earned the title ‘Hero of the Soviet Union’ for his exploits in Korea, and who, at 97 years old, is the last living Soviet ace of the Korean War.

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