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The Weekly paper of the New Communist Party of Britain


National News

No pay rise for brickies

by New Worker correspondent

According to the trade website PBC Today, the construction industry in Britain is adapting positively to changes in working practices brought about by the pandemic despite being caught off guard at the start. It points out that the repatriation of migrant workers has caused a labour shortage and forced contractors to plan more carefully and manufacturing.

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

No fuel today

by New Worker correspondent

IN Cheshire, fuel-tanker drivers employed by Hoyer Petrolog UK have voted overwhelmingly to walk out in a dispute over job cuts.

Hoyer is proposing to make six of the 28 drivers employed on the contract redundant, despite the workers having worked throughout the pandemic. The company is increasingly using agency drivers to fulfil its delivery requirements.

The 96.2 per cent vote by Unite members will see strike action being taken for fourteen 24-hour strikes throughout November. These will cause considerable disruption to fuel supplies for road users and the aviation sector in northern England, in particular Shell, Esso, BP, Essar, World Fuel Services (WFS), Motor Fuel Group (MFG), Greenenergy and Liverpool’s John Lennon Airport.

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Paying Peanuts

by New Worker correspondent

THE Kent and Medway Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG) has been busy consulting staff over redundancies, but not to worry, it has also been considering how to reward staff for working during the pandemic. Part of the consultation was the choice of reward. It is a toss-up between a badge and a ‘Graze-type’ snack box. If the latter, it means the reward will literally be peanuts. This, management told the staff, was “a genuine and heartfelt thank you to each one of you to recognise your contribution”.

The GMB union is demanding that the CCG think again about the “insulting” offer.

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Not all in it together

by New Worker correspondent

AT Heathrow Airport Limited (HAL), Unite the union have made an interesting offer to end a hire and fire scheme that would see over 4,000 workers accept pay cuts of up to £8,000 per annum (25 per cent of their pay).

The union satirically suggested that all workers should return their airport profit bonus of £700 each and all directors, including the chief executive John Holland Kaye, should also return their bonuses. Mr Holland Kaye was contractually entitled to a £565,965 bonus and a share in success payment of £1.043 million. Shareholders would be expected to pay back the £100 million of dividends paid to them earlier this year. Needless to say, this generous offer was turned down!

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Britain may water-down Brexit to appease Brussels

by Svetlana Ekimenko

AS TALKS to hammer out a deal outlining the post-Brexit relationship between Britain and the European Union stall, Prime Minister Boris Johnson warns that the UK is prepared to leave the bloc’s single market at the end of the year without a trade agreement in place.

But British officials are reportedly hoping to revive deadlocked talks with the EU by watering down Boris Johnson’s controversial Internal Market Bill, which rewrites parts of the Brexit withdrawal deal he struck with Brussels last year, reports Bloomberg.

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Scottish Political News

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

THE SNP’s current faction fight is not just being fought out in a Holyrood parliamentary committee (which is on holiday) but resuming in what outgoing nationalist MSP Alex Neil describes as a series on “mini-civil wars” in selection contests.

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Should old acquaintance be forgot…

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

Most of the votes in the United States presidential election have yet to be cast, but if the half Scottish candidate loses the race he will have more time to spend on his golf courses. To make life easier for Donald Trump Aberdeen council has allowed him to develop another 18-hole course at the Trump International golf resort at his Menie resort. This will be named the “MacLeod” after his mother who came from the Isle of Lewis.

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More Than Claps Needed

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

On Tuesday the health union Unison announced that it is holding a consultative ballot of its 60,000 health members north of the border after pay talks with the Scottish government broke down. The union’s head of health in Scotland Willie Duffy said: “Unison members are disappointed and angry that the Scottish government has failed to deliver on pay for NHS workers this year – despite assurances from both the Scottish Health Secretary and the First Minister”.

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Brigaders honoured in Southampton

by New Worker correspondent

PROGRESSIVES from across the city of Southampton gathered by the International Brigades Memorial on Saturday 17 October to honour the local men who gave their lives in the fight against fascism during the Spanish civil war. In total four men from Southampton were killed defending the Second Spanish Republic from Franco’s fascists. Their names were honoured in a memorial erected in the 2000s a memorial close to the Southampton Cenotaph in London Road.

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International News

Indonesian workers take to the streets

by Deirdre Griswold

THOUSANDS of workers and students marched and rallied in Indonesia on 7th October to protest against a new anti-labour law.

“Labour rights activists, workers and students are protesting Indonesia’s new labour law they say will undermine pay and benefits, as well as the environment. The law is part of the president’s efforts to court foreign investors in a bid to drive economic growth,” reported the Christian Science Monitor.

[Read the complete story in the print edition]

Israelis hit Gaza again

by Ed Newman

ISRAELI warplanes and helicopters have carried out fresh strikes on the besieged Gaza Strip, targeting farmlands in the coastal enclave. The Israeli airstrikes targeted farmlands in the Gaza city of Deir al-Balah late on Tuesday.

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Iran declares official end of UN arms embargo

Radio Havana Cuba

IRAN’S Foreign Ministry says the UN Security Council’s arms restrictions against Tehran have all been terminated in defiance of the United States’ efforts.

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Greek fascist leaders sentenced to 13 years

by our Balkan affairs correspondent

THE neo-Nazi leaders of Golden Dawn have each been sentenced to 13 years in prison by a court in Athens, at the end of an historic hearing. The leaders of the violent far-right group, including former MPs, were shown little leniency by judges.

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Following the footsteps of Uncle Sam

By Li Qingqing

KEN MCCALLUM, the director-general of MI5, says that Russia, China and Iran have imposed growing “national security challenges” to the UK and emphasised that the biggest long-term challenge is presented by China.

“Russia, China and Iran are sone of the few diplomatically independent countries in the world, right?” some Chinese netizens mocked.

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Features

Whose interests do the Uyghur separatists serve?

by Muhamad Enamul Hassan

THE WESTERN media has long been abuzz with the stories of “human rights violations, mass incarceration of Uyghur Muslims in concentration camps, and destruction of mosques and other Islamic sites” in northwest China’s Xinjiang. Many gullible Muslims around the world sometimes get upset when they hear the plight of their fellow Muslims in Xinjiang. In many cases, they express angry reactions against China in protest against those allegations.

However people, particularly Muslims, seem not to have the impartial narrative of what the actual situation prevailing in Xinjiang is. If they could have credible information and know the facts, their reactions would be different. It is imperative that they must know the full truth about what is happening in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region. It is now a well-known fact that there are separatist elements operating there. Muslims, as such, need to understand whose interests the Uyghur separatists are in reality serving.

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War drums over Ukraine

by Dmitriy Kovalevich

DURING September, many Ukrainians have been feeling anxious due to the increasing signs of an impending military escalation of the global conflict between Russia and the USA. Some have voiced the opinion that Ukraine could become a battlefield between the two nuclear superpowers. Naturally, this prospect is not making Ukrainians happy.

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USAID behind plans against Cuba

by Ed Newman

UNDER the suggestive name of the ‘United States Agency for International Development’ (USAID) are hidden intentions to subvert the constitutional order in sovereign and independent nations.

USAID is an agency of the State Department that has for decades served as a cover for Washington to finance illegal actions, including coups d’état, against governments elected by their citizens. Cuba has always been one of the targets of the well-known agency, which has sought to create destabilising situations to bring about political change in the country.

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