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The Weekly paper of the New Communist Party of Britain


National News

Battles of the bins

by New Worker correspondent

REFUSE-LORRY drivers in Brighton & Hove have won a long-running strike against the Green-controlled council. Drivers returned to work on Monday morning after their union, the GMB, agreed to suspend the strike that had led to rubbish piling up in the streets. This will avoid another five-week stoppage that had been on the cards had the Council not finally responded realistically to their workers’ demands.

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Pay battles ahead

by New Worker correspondent

LAST Friday the three main local government unions, Unison, Unite and GMB, who represent 1.4 million council and school staff in England, Wales and Northern Ireland, have demanded that local government employers return to the negotiating table to improve the miserable below inflation 1.75 per cent offer.

Having overwhelmingly rejected the offer, the three unions are preparing for industrial action ballots. They point out that: “The 1.75 per cent offer is wholly inadequate, and with inflation high and rising, it represents another real-terms pay cut for workers who have seen a quarter of the value of their pay wiped out since 2010.”

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Low pay problems

by New Worker correspondent

A FORMER senior Civil Servant has decried the fact that wages in the public sector are too low to attract the right talent compared with those in parts of the private sector. So said Professor Sir David Omand GCB, former head of the spy centre GCHQ in the 1990s and later permanent secretary in the Home Office.

He told the Times at the Cheltenham Literature Festival that the salary disparities have resulted in fewer people being attracted to public service. He said “it was a particular problem in the intelligence community” although other civil service departments were also affected.

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Scottish Political News

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

GLASGOW is getting ready for COP26. Anyone wanting to mount a protest or attempt an assassination can now easily study which routes will be used to transport delegates to and from the venues. These are the selected streets that are being cleaned-up to make the city look respectable.

Nicola Sturgeon may have dreamt of sharing the limelight with the great and the good in November but she’s clearly being elbowed out by Boris Johnson, who as host clearly hopes that the jamboree will boost his attempt to pose as a world statesman. But he will clearly be overshadowed by the real movers and shakers on the international arena – that is, if they all turn up.

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RMT strike

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

Much to the annoyance of the Sturgeon government, the RMT rail union is making the most of the occasion by announcing that it will be taking strike action across Scotland throughout the period of the conference as part of a long-running dispute over overtime payments for ticket inspectors, which has already seen Sunday services hit by strikes.

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Equal Pay

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

The SNP-run council has been accused of reneging on the equal pay deal secured by women workers in January 2019 after an epic struggle that saw workers such as home helps achieve equality with male outdoor workers. The three unions claim that thousands of workers have still not received their back pay.

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By-Election News

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

What may be the last local government by-election before the general round in May next year took place at Falkirk South on the 14th October. The election was caused by the unexpected resignation of a long-serving Labour councillor. It was won by the SNP on the first round, increasing their minority control of the 30-strong council from 12 to 13 seats.

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Welsh independence on the table

by Chris Summers

SCOTLAND narrowly missed gaining independence in 2014, with 45 per cent voting Yes in a referendum on the issue. Whilst the Scottish National Party is campaigning for a second referendum, independence is stirring as an issue in Wales. A new commission has now been set up to examine the future of Wales, which will consider the option of independence.

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Unions threaten strike over haulage plans

by Svetlana Ekimenko

AMIDST log-jammed ports, increasingly empty shop shelves and panic buying, the Johnson Government is facing a new crisis as trade union leaders are threatening ministers with mass walkouts over plans to lure more foreign heavy goods vehicle (HGV) drivers into the country, says the Times.

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International News

Communists back Israeli SlutWalk

CP Israel

SOME 2,000 participants marched in a ‘SlutWalk’ in Tel Aviv on Friday 15th October to protest against sexual violence, discrimination and victim-blaming. Participants, amongst them members of the Young Communist League of Israel, shouted slogans such as “I believe you” whilst carrying placards with pictures of sex offenders.

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Colin Powell: the man who lied over Iraq

Radio Havana Cuba FOR MANY Iraqis, Colin Powell is the American foreign minister who went before the United Nations Security Council in 2003 to justify a devastating war against their country.

Word of Powell’s death on Monday dredged up feelings of anger in Iraq towards the former US Secretary of State, one of several Bush administration officials whom they hold responsible for a disastrous US-led invasion that led to decades of death, chaos and violence in Iraq.

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Venezuelan president denounced American kidnap

Radio Havana Cuba

THE PRESIDENT of Venezuela, Nicolás Maduro, has demanded justice for the kidnapping of their diplomat, Alex Saab, who was arbitrarily transferred from the African state of Cape Verde to the USA.

“His only crime was to bring food, to bring medicines for the Venezuelan people,” stated the Bolivarian leader, whilst underlining the US role of persecuting anyone who tries to help Venezuela.

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Features

Victory for China: Meng returns home

by Casey Davidson

MENG Wanzhou, Chief Financial Officer of Chinese tech company Huawei, has been released from detention after being held illegally in Canada for over 1,000 days. Meng was arrested in late 2018 in Vancouver after being accused of violating US sanctions on Iran, sanctions which were not supported by the United Nations Security Council.

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Cuban intelligence chief says Americans plan new invasion

by WT Whitney Jr

FABIÁN Escalante helped to establish Cuba’s state security services. He headed Cuba’s Department of State Security from 1976 to 1996, served as vice minister of the Interior Ministry, and after 1993 led the Cuban Security Studies Centre. His views on threats from the US government and on protecting Cuba’s Revolution carry weight.

Writing on 23rd September on a Cuban website, Escalante notes that: “The internal counter-revolution is reorganising its forces and is on the offensive”. They were “calling for a ‘national strike’ for October 11…to secure the ‘liberation of political prisoners’.” He insists that, afterwards, “a group of ‘activists’, presumably counter-revolutionaries,” will be seeking authorisation from Havana municipal authorities “for a peaceful march against ‘violence’ in November”.

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What the USA really stands for

by Guillermo Alvarado

THE USA, like an eagle, traps its prey in its powerful claws, and with its great pointed beak, tears their flesh until they bleed to death.

An endless period of wars throughout the 19th century allowed the USA to consolidate its power, expand its territory and dedicate the next century to imposing its hegemony on the American continent and the world, with its army as its spearhead and a legion of unscrupulous traders.

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How British imperialism exploited India

by Manmeet Sahni

IT’S A MYTH that British imperialism benefited one of its richest colonies, India, when on the contrary it drained all its wealth and resources just like colonisers do.

This “should be taught as part of history because after all, it is their history. It’s also about acknowledging their past and learning about their ex-colonies. Denial is the worst thing,” says Assistant Professor of History Ruchika Sharma at Delhi University.

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