THE NEW WORKER

The Weekly paper of the New Communist Party of Britain
Week commencing 8th September 2017


National News

McDonald’s workers in historic strike

WORKERS at two branches of the McDonald’s fast food chain began strike action early on Monday — the first strike at McDonald’s in Britain since the chain first opened in Britain in 1974.

The workers are members of the Bakers, Food and Allied Workers Union (BFAWU). They are demanding £10-per-hour minimum pay, union recognition, an end to zero-hours contracts and an end to the bullying culture rife behind the scenes at McDonald’s.

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Sports Direct’s emoji con

THE GIANT sports clothing and equipment retailer Sports Direct last week was accused of coercing workers into saying they were happy at work by using touchpads with happy and sad face emojis (a small digital image) when clocking on — and then singling out those who chose the sad emoji for pressure and discrimination.

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Tories sitting on custody deaths report

THE TORY government is delaying the publication of an official report commissioned by Theresa May, when she was Home Secretary, into deaths in police and prison custody, according to a report in the Guardian last week.

Campaigning families of those who have died in police or prison custody are demanding that the Government now publish the report.

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20 Grenfell Tower survivors attempt suicide

AT LEAST 20 survivors and witnesses of the Grenfell Tower fire have attempted suicide, according to the charity Silence of Suicide.

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Nazi squaddies arrested

FOUR serving soldiers have been arrested under anti-terrorism laws and are charged with being members of National Action, a banned Nazi group, and suspicion of “commission, preparation and instigation of acts of terrorism”.

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Labour Leadership

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

DESPITE two hasty last minute rewrites, last week’s predictions about the new Scottish Labour leadership turned out to be outdated even before the paper hit the letterboxes. Our favoured front runner, Deputy Leader Alex Rowley, has ruled himself out.

Instead it appears that a two-way contest will be taking place. In the right-wing corner is Glasgow MSP Anas Sarwar whilst in the left corner is Richard Leonard, a new MSP for Central Scotland.

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SNP Finances

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

The SNP’s handling of their own finances perfectly reflects their handling of the public finances. According to their submission to the Electoral Commission for 2016, their cash reserves were wiped out last year by spending £1.3 million vainly trying to preserve their majority in the Scottish Parliament. They now have liabilities of £2.3 million, six times that of 2012.

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Wind-farm News

by our Scottish political affairs correspondent

On the whole wind-farms are a good thing for producing electricity but they are not without their problems. When there is no wind there is a need for alternative sources of electricity and in a gale they need to be switched off before the motors get burnt out. The SNP like to boast about producing green energy but remains silent about having to import energy from coal-fired and nuclear power stations whenever the blades cannot turn.

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Stop the war in Donbas!

by New Worker correspondent

LONDON anti-fascist campaigners returned to the streets of Whitehall last weekend in solidarity with the people of the Lugansk and Donetsk republics, and to call for an end to British military aid to the Kiev regime. NCP leader Andy Brooks joined other comrades at the picket opposite Downing Street called by the New Communist Party and Socialist Fight with the support of the Solidarity with the Anti-Fascist Resistance in Ukraine (SARU) campaign.

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Farewell to an old friend

by New Worker correspondent

COMRADES and friends attended a reception on Tuesday to say goodbye to Jorge Luis Garcia, who is returning to Havana after four years as counsellor at the Cuban embassy in London. Diplomats, Cuban solidarity campaign ers and members of London’s communist movements, including Andy Brooks from the NCP, gathered at the residence of the Cuban ambassador to thank Jorge Luis for all his help in building solidarity with Cuba over the past few years.

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Solidarity with Ukraine’s anti-fascist resistance

by New Worker correspondent

THE CALL to build solidarity with the anti-fascist resistance was renewed at a meeting in London last week called by the New Worker to discuss the current situation in Ukraine. Comrades returned to the Cock Tavern in Euston to hear NCP leader Andy Brooks, Theo Russell (NCP London), Gerry Downing of Socialist Fight and Marie Lynam of the British Posadists kick off the discussion, which ranged from the role of the Ukrainian left to the concrete problems facing the solidarity movement in the Britain today.

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International News

Assad congratulates Deir ez-Zor defenders on victory

Sputnik

SYRIAN President Bashar Assad has spoken to the commanders of the Deir ez-Zor defence force following the breaking of a three-year siege of the city by the ISIS terrorist group.

The Syrian leader told his commanders that: “It will be recorded in history how you, despite your small number, sacrificed the most valuable for the sake of civilians... Today, you and your friends fought shoulder to shoulder to lift the siege of the city.”

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Trump’s disaster donation — another broken promise?

by Pavel Jacomino

A WRITER who has known Donald Trump for three decades believes there is “no way” the US president will follow through on his pledge to donate $1 million of his own personal fortune to Hurricane Harvey victims. Tony Schwartz, the ghost-writer of Trump’s 1987 Art of the Deal memoir, took to Twitter claiming that Trump “only promises to give” and “never actually does.”

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Bangladesh communists condemn persecution of Muslims in Myanmar

Telesur

THOUSANDS of people have been turned away from the Bangladeshi border this week — almost 400 have died as they attempted to escape.

Following an escalation in state violence against Rohingya Muslims in neighbouring Myanmar (Burma), the Communist Party of Bangladesh (CPB) has strongly condemned the atrocities they continue to face.

The party denounced the “genocide, arson and ruthless torture” that the minority group has been subjected to.

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BRICS Summit raises hopes

Prensa Latina

THE BRICS group (Brazil, Russia, India, China and South Africa) of emerging nations met in the Chinese city of Xiamen this week, with Chinese president Xi Jinping heading the summit for the first time.

The five countries, who now represent 44 per cent of the world’s population and 23 per cent of global Gross Domestic Product (GDP), face a sluggish global economy and setbacks in globalisation. The group turning 11 this year may put a new shine on emerging markets and developing countries.

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Lessons from the 1811 independence of Venezuela

by Nino Pagliccia

ON 5th July Venezuelans marked the 206th anniversary of their country’s independence. For any country the commemoration of such an event is of great historical importance and pride. The term “independence” has occupied centre stage in the last 18 years of the Bolivarian Revolution. Former President Hugo Chávez and current President Nicolás Maduro have made independence and sovereignty the pillars on which the ‘21st Century Socialism’ of the Bolivarian Revolution rests.

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Features

China’s largest dam completed

by Iramsy Peraza Forte

CONTROLLING and taming the powerful waters of the Yangtze River has, for centuries, been a fundamental part of China’s history. Construction on the Three Gorges Dam began in 1993 in response to the growing energy needs of the region, home to Asia’s biggest river, and to combat the floods that swept away everything in their path.

Proposed by Mao Zedong in the 1950s, in September 2016 — 23 years after the project was launched — the Chinese government announced the completion of the mega-structure that features 32 turbine generators, a system of two-way locks and a ship elevator.

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Texas, Louisiana under water: Capitalist crime scene

by Deirdre Griswold THE COASTS of Texas and Louisiana have become an ongoing crime scene. The crime is against the millions of people living along the Gulf of Mexico as well as their property — and it is a crime against nature itself.

And who are the criminals? Some are the same politicians who, like Donald Trump, jump before the cameras to assure the public that everything possible is being done to protect them, when in fact the forces of government are doing the barest minimum.

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The Soviet A-bomb: the Cold War’s first game changer

Sputnik

THE FIRST test of the Soviet atomic bomb 78 years ago came as a surprise to US war planners and a game changer in the Cold War. Over the decades the two countries maintained nuclear parity; but the recent B61-12 gravity bomb tests by the Pentagon have evoked strong memories of the US—USSR stand-off.

On 29th August 1949 the USSR successfully tested its first nuclear bomb, which became a game changer in the Cold War that began with Winston Churchill’s Fulton speech in 1946 and the famous Truman Doctrine of 1947.

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